The best-laid plans.

From when I first sat down to begin drafting Aerovoyant to the day twenty-six months later that the final version went to the copy editor, the story had been rewritten a total of forty-two times. It had been revised and expanded, cut and tweaked, edited and massaged.  It didn't get there overnight, of course. On the… Continue reading The best-laid plans.

The world’s littlest birds

Around sunset not long ago, a hummingbird flew into our house.

As a bit of backstory, I’ve always wanted to live in a cabin with nothing but wilderness for miles. That never happened and instead, our house is in the middle of American Suburbia. It’s comfortable, but the closest we get to 'wilderness' is to throw open the patio doors now and then. In all the years we’ve lived here we’ve never had a bird fly in. Bugs, yes; a mouse or two. An alligator lizard. Never a bird.

Science to fiction

When I left research in 2018 to try my hand at fiction, it felt like I was making a huge course change in life.

The decision itself, the one to leave research, was simple. After all, the science of climate change—which I’d been working on—was settled, and more research would bring ever-diminishing returns on that. On the other hand, putting energy into fiction as a means of making climate science more enjoyable to talk about was a way to keep working toward greater sustainability. Still, I had no idea what challenges I’d face, and that uncertainty made the switch itself feel very dicey.